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Calla Lily Steele: Notes on a foster dog

This is Calla Lily. Her Mom called her Lily, or Li-Li (lee lee). She’s a yellow Lab mix, and an affectionate, playful girl.

Last updated: Nov 9, 2018

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: Oct. 20, 2018
  • Breed: Yellow Lab mix
  • Sex: Female
  • Age: Young, Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: 35 Pounds (as of 10/12/18)
  • Spay/Neutered: Yes
  • General Health: Good
  • Temperament: Rowdy but friendly.
  • Gets Along with Dogs: Yes
  • Gets Along with People: Yes
  • Housebroken/Crate Trained: Yes
  • Departure date: Nov. 9th, 2018

History

Lily’s mom adopted her from a shelter at 4 months of age in January of 2018. Lily had some health problems, but came through them. As she grew, Lily became too strong and rowdy for Mom to handle and she made the hard decision to surrender her to Steele Away Home so Lily could get the training she needs and go to a permanent home. It was a tearful parting.

Known Issues & Progress

She’s rowdy. Needs self-control and obedience training.

She knows, “Come”, “Sit”, and “In your room”.

Lily has proven to be quite bright and has learned all her basic commands. She also knows that when she’s done pottying and playing in the yard, she gets a treat to go back in her kennel. So when she’s decided she’s done, she runs into her kennel and sits on her bed to signal me that it’s time to bring her a treat.  Who’s training who here? 🙂

She has calmed down quite a bit.

She walks well on a leash for me, but gives Marie a hard time.

As long as she it let out regularly, she is good to her bedding.  If she gets frustrated, her bedding suffers!

Medical

  • DHPP: 01/12/2018, 02/03/2018, by White Pine Veterinary (WPV)
  • DHLPP:02/24/2018 by WPV
  • Bordatella: 02/24/2018, 10/13/2018 by WPV
  • Wormed: 01/12/2018 by WPV (tested since: NEGATIVE)
  • Rabies: 02/24/2018 (1 year booster) by WPV
  • Spay/Neuter: 04/24/2018 by WPV (also repaired umbilical hernia)
  • Flea/Tick preventative: ???
  • Heartworm preventative: ???
  • Heartworm Test: 05/11/2018 – NEGATIVE by WPV

Gallery

In roughly chronological order, newest at the bottom. Click the thumbnails to enlarge. Some pictures are linked to Doggy Tales and videos about Lily, click those to open the related story or video.

 

A pretty girl strutting her stuff.

Spectacular eyes!

On Point

Lily and Ugg play together for 1st time. (video)

Lily does Come, Sit and In your room (video)

Lily and Josephine get a play day (video)
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“I’m ready for my treat now!” (video)
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A Trick for (giving) Treats

When training a dog, I find that giving SMALL treats as a reward for proper responses speeds the learning process and makes the session far more enjoyable for the dog and for myself.  But what do you do when you have a dog that is so eager to get that treat that she’ll take your thumb and finger with the treat if you hold it between them?  Here’s my Trick for Treats:

When a dog is gentle about taking treats, this is not an issue — like Ugg:

When giving larger treats (not training treats) presenting them sideways to the dog helps prevent the dog from taking your hand along with the treat:

When NOT to use treats in training

When I first start training a dog that has been living on the streets for a while, I don’t use treats at all.  These dogs are often so food-centric that as soon as they discover I’m carrying food they will do anything — including knocking me over and tearing open the pocket or pouch — to get it.  They have no idea about doing what I want them to do to get the food doled out to them a morsel at a time.  They want the food, they want all of it, they want it NOW.  That can be dangerous.

So instead I reward these dogs’ good behavior with head scratches and neck rubs.  And that may take some work too.  Dogs that have been abused or neglected for a long time are not accustomed to being touched except in violence and will be skittish about it.  Be patient.  Take it slow.  Earn his trust. Use a soft voice, and stay as low as possible so you are not towering over the dog.  That’s intimidating to them.  Also avoid staring at her eyes: her instincts tell her this is a challenge and hostility.

Once he’s adjusted to the idea that touching is pleasant, petting will serve as reward enough until you’ve gained enough respect that he will trust you to give out the food treats as they are earned.

If you enjoy our updates, Doggy Tales, and educational articles consider subscribing for notices when new pieces are posted. It’s painless and you can unsubscribe any time you want. Your e-mail address is used ONLY to deliver these notices.