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Validation of Why We Do Canine Foster Care

Doug
The dogtor is in

As of January 2017 we have fostered 38 dogs in 4½ years. That’s not an astounding number: I know many people who foster several times our annual average. Sometimes they have 6 or 8 dogs at a time, we generally have two or three (plus our two). But we take in the hard cases. We get the heartworm positive dogs that need to be nursed through a long treatment and recovery period. We take in those with “behavioral issues” and turn unmanageable hooligans into adoptable companions. It is trying work. Not all have been major challenges (most are simply large dogs who were never trained to behave) but there have been a few.

Luna and Housing Trials

Luna has been something of an enigma since her arrival.  On the one hand, she has been single-minded in her attempts to escape.  She came here because NAC had no place they could humanely confine her.  Once she got here she set about dismantling her kennel.  I finally had to armor plate the inside of her “room” to prevent her getting purchase on the  safety mesh or chain-link with her claws and shredding the former and distorting the latter.  Before I got that done, she actually bent the panel clamps and pulled the door panel into her kennel!

Safety mesh on lower half prevents “chewing” chain link.

Mesh shredded, she yanked a panel loose!

Her neighbors, Da Boyz, are SHOCKED by the carnage!

I armor plated the inside to prevent further destruction.

While all this was going on, i was taking her out for leash walks four times a day.  The other dogs are released to run and play in our fenced yard, but Luna’s determination to escape causes me to worry that she will just go over a wall as soon as I’m not watching.  A theory that was verified the first time I put her on a tether so I could clean her kennel.  She wriggled out of her harness and I caught her trying to hop over the wall by our back porch.  Luna is a big girl and Animal Control learned that she could climb out of their 6′ high kennels.  I have a steel net over the top of mine to discourage that.

Lemaster Steele

This precious boy has obviously been someones treasured companion. He shows no aggression, is well behaved, knows some commands, and is housebroken. All he needs is a family to love him again.

Last updated: July 4, 2019

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: June 15, 2019
  • Breed: Boston Terr/AmBull mix
  • Sex: Male
  • Age: Young Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: 31 Pounds
  • Spay/Neutered: Yes
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: Affectionate, well behaved, gentle
  • Gets Along with Dogs: Yes (cats too)
  • Gets Along with People: Yes (even toddlers)
  • Housebroken/Crate Trained: Yes
  • Departure date: July 4, 2019

History

Picked up as a stray by The City of Newport Animal Control and not claimed, but this good boy has obviously been someone’s house dog.

Progress Notes:

Detailed update notes on our foster dogs are posted regularly. For a listing of updates that include Lemaster [click here]. A summation is included below.

Foster Dog Updates for July 5th, 2019

The noise comes from gun powder. We could do without the gun powder and just enjoy the pretty colors.

Well, we survived the Apocalypse of July.  Buddy spent the evening in his hunker bunker, Josephine managed to squeeze under our bed (amazing!) then poked her nose out and said, “Come on in, Blondie Bear, it’s better under here.”  Blondie (4 times Josie’s size) just looked at her with exasperation and poked my elbow with her nose.  Her signal that she desperately needs scritchies.  Callie Roo curled up in a ball on a snuggle bed and trembled.

I don’t know if rain intervened or if the revelers ran out of combustibles, but, mercifully, the noise fest did not drag on into the night.  Once all the noise subsided, the entire group of us heaved a collective sigh of relief and drifted off to sleep.

Lemaster

Luna N.A.C.: Notes on a foster dog

This is a foster dog diary post about Luna. New information will be added to the end of this post so all info on this dog (well, most of it) is kept in one place and in chronological order. If you subscribe for updates, a short note will be sent when updates are posted. If you don’t subscribe, check back periodically to see what’s been added.

Last Updated: July 12, 2019

Luna arrived today. Luna was a stray picked up by Newport Animal Control and taken to their facility. She is a Great Dane / Black Lab mix. Not terribly large as, Danes go, but larger than the average dog and quite strong despite being scrawny from hunger.  Luna could easily climb out of the regular kennels at N.A.C.  The only kennel they have that could contain her is their “vicious dog cell” and that is in a part of the building that is not air conditioned. In the late-June mid-day heat, it becomes far too hot for anything to stay in there long. They needed another solution. So the manager, Lisa, reached out to me: would I foster her for them? We found a way to make that happen and I picked her up this morning.

Luna remains the “property” of Newport Animal Control.  Adoption or surrender to rescue will be handled by Lisa or Alicia at Animal Control, ask them about that.

 

City of Newport Animal Control
219 East Main Street,
Newport, TN, 37821
(423) 625-8444
AnimalControl@NewportTN.com

I know more about Luna because I’m the one caring for her, direct questions about her health, temperament, and training to me via comment on this article (bottom of page) or e-mail.  Most are also linked to from a summary blurb in the detailed notes.

Lunarrival

Luna arrived today. Luna is a special case: a stray picked up by Newport Animal Control and taken to their facility.  She is a Black Lab / Great Dane mix.  Small, as Great Danes go, but larger than the average dog and quite strong despite being scrawny from hunger.

Newport Animal Control is working out of a make-shift facility in an unused building downtown.  Their kennels are lightweight, free-standing affairs.  Not sturdy enough to hold Luna, who proved able to climb over the walls and/or pull the door until the latch bends and it opens.  The only kennel they had that could contain her was their “vicious dog cell” and that is in a part of the building that is not air conditioned.  In the late-June mid-day heat, it becomes far too hot for anything to stay in there long.  They needed another solution.  So the manager, Lisa, reached out to me: would I foster her for them?  We found a way to make that happen and I picked her up this morning.

Foster Dog Notes for May 27, 2019

Little has changed in the past week.

Rocky

Rocky is doing better at leash walking, he is now consistently able to walk a full circumnavigation of the play yard without needing serious coaxing. He does tend to watch my hands and the treat bag all the time. But that’s okay.

Rocky is still keeping his kennel clean, preferring to poop in the yard. He will be transferring to another Steele Away Home foster for formal housebreaking early in June; once her foster dog has gone out on the rescue run.

Blaze

Blaze has lead the charge in munching down my berry bushes. I grow blueberries, blackberries, Boysenberries, black raspberries, and red raspberries. These grow in a berry patch in the play yard and have gone mostly unmolested by the dogs until now. Blaze decided that the ripe red raspberries were a refreshing snack, then he started on the others, and now is chewing on the unripe blueberries. Rocky and Sable are following his example. This is rather distressing since they are eating the bushes as well as the berries. These doggoes seem to think they’re GOATS!

Foster dog notes for May 18th, 2019

Lennon has been accepted by Lucky Dog Rescue in Wisconsin.  He will be leaving us on June 1st.  I got a preview of how that’s going to go over yesterday: I took Lennon on a trash run.  When we got back, he decided to stay in the yard while I went inside.  Blondie and Josephine mistook the situation:

Sable

Our wild child is learning self-control, and that when she does control herself (not jumping up on me and grabbing at my arms or hands with her teeth) she gets petted and belly rubs.  When she gets demanding, she does not.  If she insists on being demanding, she goes back to her kennel and that play time is over.  She’s got a ways to go, but she’s learning.

Sable Steele 2

Sable was a wild child: she’d had NO training but does get along with other dogs and likes people. In fact she craves attention from people. She just didn’t know how to relate to us properly. That’s why she’s here.

Last updated: July 3, 2019

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: April 29, 2019
  • Breed: Mixed hound
  • Sex: Female
  • Age: Puppy, Young Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: @ 35 Pounds
  • Spayed: Yes
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: Wild Child
  • Gets Along with Dogs: Yes
  • Gets Along with People: Yes
  • Housebroken/Crate Trained: No
  • Departure date: Undetermined

History

Sable came here from another foster situation where she was sharing a kennel with at least two other dogs. They were well cared for, but needed training. Before that, it is my understanding, that she was abandoned with her siblings as puppies.

Progress Notes:

Detailed update notes on our foster dogs are posted regularly. For a listing of updates that include Sable [click here]. A summation of her progress is included below.

Rocky Steele: Notes on a foster dog

Rocky was the alpha (dominant) in a bonded pair of brothers. He spent nearly all of his life in a shelter and was skittish around people. He needed socialization, and release from his roll as his brother’s keeper. This has been achieved.

Last updated: July 12. 2019

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: April 17, 2019
  • Breed: Hound mix
  • Sex: Male
  • Age: Young, Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: @ 40 Pounds
  • Spay/Neutered: Yes
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: Good: has become affectionate.
  • Gets Along with Dogs: Yes
  • Gets Along with People: Yes is a little skittish around new people.
  • Housebroken/Crate Trained: Working on it
  • Departure date: July 12, 2019 headed for SAVE

History

Rocky was one of 6 puppies and their mother who were owner surrendered to Newport Animal Control because the original owner went to jail, the owner’s father didn’t want the dogs and his mother could do nothing with them because the mother dog became aggressive after she gave birth. All of the dogs were adopted out, Blaze and Rocky together, but were returned because they were kept outside and they barked, causing neighbors to complain. Rocky and his brother had become bonded, with Rocky as the dominant. Rocky tended to bully his larger brother, eating his food, taking his treats, but also played the role of protector and alpha.

Progress Notes:

Detailed update notes on our foster dogs are posted regularly. For a listing of updates and Doggie Tales that include Rocky [click here]. A summation of his progress is included below.