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Phoenix: Notes on a foster dog

Phoenix is so named because everyone who knows her believes that although she may have been found in the ashes of her life, she WILL rise again.

Last Updated: Jan 15, 2020

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: Jan. 15, 2020
  • Breed: Shepherd mix
  • Sex: Female
  • Age: Puppy, Young Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: 34 Pounds at intake
  • Spayed/Neutered: Yes / No / Unknown
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: Scared but sweet.
  • Departure date: Undetermined

History

Phoenix was spotted running loose behind Food City West in Newport and Animal Control was called in to catch her.  She was scrawny, wormy, and extremely frightened, but not at all aggressive.  She spent 25 days at Animal Control before PMFC pulled her on behalf of ARNNE.  During that time she ate very little and was scared and depressed despite the NAC staff’s attempts to comfort her and provide an enticing diet.

Phoenix’s Progress Summary:

Detailed notes on this foster dog’s progress are posted below the summary.

Relational Behavior

  • Relates well to other dogs: Yes
  • Can eat food/treats near other dogs: No Yes
  • Preferred style of play:
  • Is affectionate: Yes
  • Is good with:
    . Men: Yes
    . Women: Yes
    . Children: No Yes
    . Cats: Yes (no reaction to cats at NAC)
  • Jumps up on people: No Yes
  • Mouths: No Yes
  • Walks well on a leash: Yes

House Dog Training

  • Willingly enters his crate: No Yes
  • Is calm/quiet while in crate: No Yes
  • Understands going outside to potty: No Yes
  • Alerts me of need to go outside: No Yes
  • Is destructive of bedding and/or toys: No Yes
  • Refrains from kitchen counter cruising: No Yes
  • Stays off people furniture: No Yes

Commands:

  • Comes when called: No Yes
  • Sits on command: No Yes
  • Down / Off: No Yes
  • Shake / Paw: No Yes
  • Kennels on command: No Yes

Medical

  • DA2PP: 12/23/19 (NAC)
    . Booster:
  • Bordatella: 01/16/2020 (PMFC)
  • Wormed: Dates | Product | Dose | By
    . 12/20/2019 Pyrantel 3 cc NAC
    . 01/14/2020 Proziquantel ?? NAC
    . 01/14-16/2020 Panacur 8 ml NAC/PMFC
  • Rabies: date (by)
  • Spay/Neuter: date (by)
  • Heartworm Test: 01/14/2020, Neg (Cedarwood)
  • Flea/Tick preventative:
    . date, product, dose
  • Heartworm preventative:
    . 01/16/2020, Ivermectin solution, 0.4 ml
  • NOTES:
    .
    .

Diet

4Health Salmon & Potato recipe, 2 cups AM, 2 cups PM plus 2 Tbsp coconut oil at each feeding

Gallery

PIC PIC PIC
FEATURED VIDEO
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Progress Updates

Progress notes are listed below, in chronological order, newest at the bottom.

DATE

TEXT BEGINS

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Scout: Notes on a foster dog

Originally named “Gus” by the Friends Animal Shelter, details eventually came out as to who he was and why he is so scared of people.  You’d be scared too if someone shot you in the head!  Scout is here to find serenity and learn trust once again.

Last Updated: Jan. 14

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: Jan. 14, 2020
  • Breed: Shepherd Mix
  • Sex: Male
  • Age: Puppy, Young Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: @ 55 Pounds
  • Spayed/Neutered: Unknown
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: SCARED!
  • Gets Along with: People, Dogs, Cats
  • Crate Trained: No
  • Housebroken: No
  • Departure date: Undetermined

History

Scout was part of a “pack” of dogs whose owner let them run loose in the neighborhood.  One neighbor took exception to that and shot Scout in the head.  He survived — physically — but is so scared of people now he won’t let most people anywhere near him.

Scout’s Progress Summary:

Detailed notes on this foster dog’s progress are posted below the summary.

Dog to Dog Behavior

  • Relates well to other dogs: Yes
  • Can eat food/treats near other dogs: No  Yes
  • Preferred style of play:

Dog to People Behavior

  • Is affectionate: No
  • Is good with:
    .   Men: No
    .   Women: No (except Autumn at FAS, he likes her.)
    .   Children: No
  • Jumps up on people: No
  • Mouths: No
  • Walks well on a leash: No – gator rolls

House Dog Training

  • Willingly enters his crate: No
  • Is calm/quiet while in crate: No  Yes
  • Understands going outside to potty: No  Yes
  • Alerts me of need to go outside: No  Yes
  • Is destructive of bedding and/or toys: No  Yes
  • Refrains from kitchen counter cruising: No  Yes
  • Stays off people furniture: No  Yes

Commands:

  • Comes when called: No
  • Sits on command: No
  • Down / Off: No
  • Shake / Paw: No
  • Kennels on command: No

Medical

  • DA2PP: date (by)
    . Booster:
  • Bordatella: date (by)
  • Wormed: Dates | Product | Dose | By
  • Rabies: date (by)
  • Spay/Neuter: date (by)
  • Heartworm Test: date, result (by)
  • Flea/Tick preventative:
    . date, product, dose
  • Heartworm preventative:
    . date, product, dose
  • NOTES:
    .
    .

Diet

4Health Salmon & Potato recipe, 1½ cups AM, 1¼ cups PM.

Gallery

In chronological order, newest at the bottom. Some pictures are linked to a more detailed Doggy Tale about that update, click those to open the related story.

Your room is ready, sir.
PIC PIC PIC

PIC PIC PIC PIC

Progress Updates

Progress notes are listed below, in chronological order, newest at the bottom.

Jan 14

Today Scout bade farewell (for a while) to Autumn at Friends Animal Shelter.  She was the only staff member able to get inside Scout’s defenses (and his kennel).  She accomplished this with her gentle spirit — and bags of Krystal cheeseburgers.

I took her advice and showed up for my first “interview” with Scout with a bag of bribery in tow.  It worked, he let me come into his kennel and sit in one corner while he cowered in the opposite corner.  But he let me in!

Yesterday Marie bought a box of White Castle cheeseburgers at the grocery store — they’re pretty much the same, right?  Maybe not!  Today I held out a quarter of a White Castle to Scout, he sniffed it and turned up his nose, “That is NOT a Krystal cheeseburger!”  He wanted nothing to do with it — until we got him into the transport box and were on our way to PMFC, then he decided to pick out the meat and cheese, but stomped the bun into paste on the floor of his box.

I guess I’ll be having those White Castles in the fridge for lunch for a few days!

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Cheyan Cinnastreak: Notes on a foster dog

Friday the 13th may be unlucky to some, but for Cheyan this was one wonderfully lucky day:
she got sprung from Animal Control, passed her blood tests, and got to meet a couple more Beagles!

Last Updated: Jan 15, 2020

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: Dec. 13, 2019
  • Breed: Beagle
  • Sex: Female
  • Age: Puppy, Young Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: 31.2 Pounds currently
  • Spayed/Neutered: Yes
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: A bit timid, but very sweet and friendly.
  • Departure date: January 17, headed for New Hampshire.

History

Cheyan was an owner surrender.  Her Mom lived in an apartment with no yard, and just let Cheyan run loose.  Neighbors were complaining and calling Animal Control.  When they picked up Cheyan, Mom said, “Just keep her.”  When she came to Animal Control she was terrified: all eyeballs and tremble.  The staff there worked with her and she has calmed down, but was still skittish with strangers.

Cheyan’s Progress Summary:

Detailed notes on this foster dog’s progress are posted below the summary.

Dog to Dog Behavior

  • Relates well to other dogs: Yes
  • Can eat food/treats near other dogs: Yes
  • Preferred style of play: She likes to run/chase and wrestling.

Dog to People Behavior

  • Is affectionate: Yes
  • Is good with:
    . Men: Is scared of large men, does fine with me.
    . Women: Yes
    . Children: Yes
    . Cats: Yes
  • Jumps up on people: Yes, but is very gentle, seeking petting.  Still, I’m working on that.
  • Mouths: No
  • Walks well on a leash: Yes

House Dog Training

  • Willingly enters her crate: Yes, with a bribe.
  • Is calm/quiet while in crate: Yes.  If left alone she will bark for a bit, but settles down.
  • Understands going outside to potty: Yes
  • Alerts me of need to go outside: Yes: goes to the door.
  • Is destructive of bedding and/or toys: No
  • Refrains from kitchen counter cruising: No.  She knows it’s bad, but … she’s a beagle.
  • Stays off people furniture: Mostly.

Commands:

  • Comes when called: Usually
  • Sits on command: Yes
  • Down / Off: Yes
  • Shake / Paw: No
  • Kennels on command: Yes

Medical

  • DA2PP: 12/07/2019 (NAC)
    . Booster: 12/21/2019 (PMFC)
  • Bordatella: 12/07/2019 (NAC)
  • Wormed: Dates | Product | Dose | By
    .   12/07/2019 Pyrantel Pamoate 2.0 ml (NAC)
  • Rabies: 12/26/2019 (Cedarwoood)
  • Spay/Neuter: 12/26/2019 (Cedarwoood)
  • Heartworm Test: 12/13/2019, Negative (Cedarwood)
  • Flea/Tick preventative:
    . 12/29/2019, Credelio, 25-50 lbs
  • Heartworm preventative:
    . 12/13/2019, Ivermectin Solution, 0.3 ml
    . 01/13/2020 Heartgard, 26-50 lb
  • NOTES:
    .  She has been underweight because she’s a picky eater.  It is suspected she existed on table scraps before.  21.4 lbs at NAC intake.
    .

Diet

4Health Salmon & Potato recipe, 1¼ cups AM, 1 cup PM.  She is eating this well now.
Loves our peanut butter treats as rewards.

Gallery

In chronological order, newest at the bottom. Some pictures are linked to a more detailed Doggy Tale about that update, click those to open the related story.

FEATURED VIDEO

Progress Updates

Notes on Cheyan’s progress will be entered below: newest on the bottom.

Dec 13

When I first met Cheyan, she was still quite scared: choosing to stay at the back of her kennel and tremble.  Today she did better.  It did not take nearly as long as I thought it might to win her trust enough to fit her into a harness.  I was warned that she’s a runner.  If she gets loose, she will turn into a cinnamon colored streak that is exceptionally hard to catch again.  A harness is more secure, and easier on her neck if she decides to start jerking the leash.  She did not.  In fact she walked well in the harness.

I took her to Cedarwood Veterinary Hospital for her Heartworm test.  While she was with me in the waiting room, she sat calmly between my knees.  When folks came to say “Hi” she responded well to most.  There was one fellow — large side of average for a man — who came in with a cat, stopped to pet Cheyan but she dived under the chairs.  As we were leaving, another large fellow met us outside and, although he was friendly and gentle, Cheyan was terrified of him.   She did not react this way to the women, and she was wary of me at first, but got past that quickly.  I suspect this is because I’m small, for a man, and I got down on the floor with her quickly to ease her tensions.

Cheyan has had a potty run with Buddy Beagle.  They got along famously!  When I went into her kennel to put on her walking harness, she stood up and slipped her head through the neck hole — she really wanted to go for a walk.  Smart girl!

Dec. 23

Cheyan has given me no trouble at all.  She’s a sweet, loving little gal who adores being petted, enjoys playing with other dogs, and runs like the wind.  She’s good at keep-away, too.  Until she will reliably come when called, I keep a “handle” on her during yard play time.  This is a 12 to15 foot length of rope with a piston clip fastened to one end.  I attach this to the collar or harness of dogs in training so I can get hold of them by grabbing or stepping on the rope as they tease me by flashing by, just out of reach.

She walks well on a leash, and looks forward to going inside at night.  She sleeps in a crate, has not torn up her blankets and is quiet once she gets past the initial, “don’t go away” phase right after I leave the room.

Dec 26

I took Cheyan to Cedarwood Veterinary Hospital this morning for her spay surgery.  She rode inside the extended-cab with me and did well.  I’ve set up a crate for her in the house where she will be sleeping until she transports north in January.

After her surgery, Cheyan was in a good deal of pain, but refused to take her Tramadol (for said pain).  Eventually I had to poke it down her throat, which she made more traumatic than it needed to be.

The only thing she has eaten in the last 24 hours got vomited up in the truck on the way home from the veterinarian, so the pain meds hit hard and fast on an empty stomach.  Hopefully she will feel like eating in the morning after a good night’s rest.

Dec 28

Cheyan went over 30 hours without eating or drinking anything.  Everything she consumed, even water, came right back up.  I took her to Cedarwood and Dr. Courtney gave her an IV injection of something to fight the nausea.  That worked.  She finally settled in to sleep and when she awoke was able to keep down a little water.  She wasn’t interested in the food I offered her.  So we tried some shredded mozzarella cheese and bacon bits.  That interested her!  So I rolled out my secret weapon.  Something I keep on hand to use in giving medications to dogs who won’t take pills hidden in cheese, peanut butter, or hot dog: Cat food!  The tins of cat food with small chunks of meat in gravy.  Dogs go nuts for that stuff and its got less salt and fat than cheese and bacon – which is okay as a kick-starter but not a meal.  I gave her half of a can of the canned cat food and she licked the bowl clean!  I left her a small bowl of kibble to nibble on over night, and she has, but don’t want to over-do on her first meal after being empty for so long.

Oh, and she is not as housebroken as I had thought.  So I set up a BIG crate for her to rest in.

Jan 5

Cheyan has recovered well from her surgery.  She is eating regularly and eagerly.  She’s still a bit thin, but no so bony now that she’s been eating.  She does run a lot so she burs up a lot of the calories she takes in..

Cheyan still gets along with everyone.  She is better at the house breaking thing but I have to keep an eye on her.  When she needs to go out she goes to the door.  If I miss that, she will pee on the floor.  She has never left a BM in the house.  As long as I let her out often she’s fine.

She can eat free-range with the other dogs.  And she plays well with everyone.  She is not intimidating to anyone (other than having weaponized her cone (LOL)) but is the only one who can keep up with Bandit.

Jan 14

Cheyan hanging with her friends.

Cheyan & Blondie

Hey, what gives?

Mischief with Buddy

Resting with Callie Roo

Snoozing with Josie

Jan 15

Cheyan has been doing really well in her house-breaking: no accidents in quite a while now, and she has started coming to get me if I don’t see her standing at the door.  She’s also ready to dispense with the crate for sleeping at night.

She pays attention when she gets rowdy in the house and I teller to settle down.  And she is doing much better at going outside and coming back.  Where she would go out and stay out for an hour or more, she now comes back more quickly.  This is good when we’re doing potty runs and another shift needs to go out.

I don’t like letting all 6 dogs go out unsupervised at once — too much chance of one aggravating another, who grumps, which could start an argument, which will turn into a full-on dog fight as everyone piles in.  Not good!  I avoid setting that up.

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Burton Flirtsworthy: Notes on a foster dog

Burton is quite the lover.  He loves everyone, and just wants attention.  He even plays with cats.

 

Last Updated: Dec 28

Base Info:

 

  • Arrival date: Dec. 7, 2019
  • Breed: Black & Tan Hound
  • Sex: Male
  • Age: Puppy, Young Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: @ 49 Pounds (should be 60-70)
    .              54.8 pounds 12/18
  • Spayed/Neutered: Not yet
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: Friendly, affectionate, gentle.
  • Gets Along with: People, Dogs, Cats
  • Crate Trained: Yes
  • Housebroken: Working on it
  • Departure date: Undetermined

History

Picked up as a stray on November 30th, this poor boy was skin and bones.  He needed some serious groceries!

Progress Summary:

Detailed notes on this foster dog’s progress are posted below the summary.

Dog to Dog Behavior

  • Relates well to other dogs: Yes
  • Can eat food/treats near other dogs: No: is grabby from being starved.
  • Preferred style of play: He’s not really into play.  He prefers to explore the yard.  Another dog may join him on walking around, but if the other gets rowdy, Burton retires to his room.

Dog to People Behavior

  • Is affectionate: Yes
  • Is good with:
    . Men: Yes
    . Women: Yes
    . Children: Unknown – but probably.
  • Jumps up on people: No
  • Mouths: No
  • Walks well on a leash: No.  Pulls.  Working on that

House Dog Training

  • Willingly enters his crate: Yes
  • Is calm/quiet while in crate: Yes
  • Understands going outside to potty: Yes
  • Alerts me of need to go outside: No.
  • Is destructive of bedding and/or toys: No
  • Refrains from kitchen counter cruising: No he will seek food anywhere it may be found.
  • Stays off people furniture: No Yes

Commands:

  • Comes when called: Sometimes
  • Sits on command: Yes
  • Down / Off: No
  • Shake / Paw: No
  • Kennels on command: Yes

Burton’s Medical

  • DA2PP: 11/30/2019 (FAS)
    . Booster: 12/18/2019 (FAS)
  • Bordatella: 11/30/2019 (FAS)
  • Wormed: 11/30 to 12/02/2019 | Product? | 9.8 ml | (FAS)
  • Rabies: NEEDED
  • Spay/Neuter: NEEDED
  • Heartworm Test: NEEDED, result (by)
  • Flea/Tick preventative:
    . date, product, dose
  • Heartworm preventative:
    . date, product, dose
  • NOTES:
    . Burton was underweight by 15 pounds.
    . Burton’s teeth are bad, but that does not seem to affect his eating.

Diet

4Health Salmon & Potato recipe, 1¼ cups with 2 Tbs Coconut oil 3x daily.  Down from 1 cup 5x daily now that he’s looking good.

Gallery

In chronological order, newest at the bottom. Some pictures are linked to a more detailed Doggy Tale about that update, click those to open the related story.

Progress Updates

 

Dec 8

He loaded up easily and rode well in a transport box from FAS to PMFC.  Initial meetings with the PMFC gang went smoothy, Bandit really wanted to play with him.  I think the two of them will get along well.  But I was wrong.  Bandit is too “enthusiastic”, Burton is not strong enough to match him, so Burton retreats.  He likes Buddy Beagle, though!

That night, he crated easily and settled in right away.

Sunday afternoon I let him play with Josephine (who declined) and Buddy (who followed Burton around calmly).  He’s doing exceptionally well at getting along with others.

Dec 18

I took Burton to FAS for his parvo booster today.  It’s COLD out so I let him ride in the extended cab of my truck instead of using a transport box in the back.  I have a shell over the bed so there would be no wind, but there’s no heat back there so it would still be 29° in there.  He did well.  He also behaved at the shelter, even played with a couple of hallway cats.

Dec 28

Burton is looking much better.  Being a big, lanky hound Burton should be … lanky.  But not scrawny like he was.  His ribs, spine, and hips no longer show through in sharp relief and he is building muscle in his legs.  His cough has cleared up too.

But he is still the sweet, gentle, affectionate fellow Burton has always been.  He will make a great family companion.

He still attacks his food like he hasn’t eaten in days, and he has become quite strong – and can pull like a tractor on a leash.  Using a front clip helps deter that.  He has not torn up the bedding in his crate and he LOVES going inside at night to sleep.

He likes to explore and will be a wanderer if allowed to run loose.  Burton is ready to seek a forever home.

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Dawson Wigglestump: Notes on a foster dog

This is a foster dog diary post about Dawson. New information will be added to the end of this post so all info on this dog is kept in one place and in chronological order. If you subscribe for updates, a short note will be sent when updates are posted. If you don’t subscribe, check back periodically to see what’s been added.

Last Updated: Dec. 7

Dawson is a friendly, gentle, amusing fellow.  I can’t imagine why someone starved him then dumped him.

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: Dec. 2, 2019
  • Breed: Boxer/hound mix
  • Sex: Male
  • Age: Puppy, Young Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: 53.8 Pounds
  • Neutered: Not yet
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: Sweet, playful, loving
  • Gets Along with: People, Dogs, Cats
  • Crate Trained: Yes
  • Housebroken: Yes No
  • Departure date: December 7th, 2019

History

Dawson was dumped by someone at the end of a dead-end road in Del Rio. He was 30 pounds under-weight and in pretty rough shape, but still a sweet boy. A local called Animal Control to come rescue him.  He weighed 46.1 pounds at that time – should be at least 70 pounds!  Friends Animal Shelter put eight pounds on him before he came here.  I’ll finish the job so they can adopt him into a GOOD home.

Progress Summary:

Detailed notes on this foster dog’s progress are posted below the summary.

Dog to Dog Behavior

  • Relates well to other dogs: Yes
  • Can eat food/treats near other dogs: No Yes
  • Preferred style of play: He likes to play with a large ball.  Hasn’t initiated play with Blondie yet.

Dog to People Behavior

  • Is affectionate: Yes
  • Is good with:
    . Men: Yes
    . Women: Yes
    . Children: Unknown
  • Jumps up on people: He bounces into me in play.
  • Mouths: No
  • Walks well on a leash: Yes

House Dog Training

  • Willingly enters his crate: Yes
  • Is calm/quiet while in crate: Yes
  • Understands going outside to potty: No Yes
  • Alerts me of need to go outside: No Yes
  • Is destructive of bedding and/or toys: No
  • Refrains from kitchen counter cruising: No Yes
  • Stays off people furniture: No Yes

Commands:

  • Comes when called: Getting better
  • Sits on command: Yes
  • Down / Off: No
  • Shake / Paw: No
  • Kennels on command: With bribery

Dawson’s Medical

  • DA2PP: 11/19/2019 (FAS)
    . Booster:
  • Bordatella: 11/19/2019 (FAS)
  • Wormed: 11/19/2019, Panacur, 9 ml (FAS)
  • Rabies: NEEDED
  • Spay/Neuter: NEEDED
  • Heartworm Test: NEEDED, result (by)
  • Flea/Tick preventative:
    . date, product, dose
  • Heartworm preventative:
    . date, product, dose
  • NOTES:
    . At intake he has a bad case of runny stool due to his digestive system shutting down from starvation.  I’ll add sweet potato to his kibble to help regulate the bowels.
    .

Diet

1 cup 4Health Salmon & Potato recipe with Coconut oil and fresh sweet potato added,  5 times daily

Gallery

In chronological order, newest at the bottom. Some pictures are linked to a more detailed Doggy Tale about that update, click those to open the related story.

Progress Updates

When picked up by Animal Control, Dawson weighed only 46.1 pounds when he should be at least 70 pounds.  He was described to me as being “skin on bones”.  He is approximately 1 year old, maybe a bit less.  Probably someone’s Christmas puppy last year, now dumped to make room for this years “gift”.  His digestive system isn’t working right from having been empty for too long.  We’re addressing that with pureed pumpkin and small, frequent meals.

When I picked him up he met the shelter cat on his way to the scales.  He gave the cat a friendly, “Hello there!” and kept walking.

Dec. 02

His first day has been spent settling in.  Our gang has been out to meet him and no one had any disparaging words.  Except Spartacus the 23 pound beagle.  He stood up on fencing and baroo’d several times, telling Dawson that he is boss here.  Dawson cocked his head and looked at him with a “you’ve GOT to be kidding me” look.

Dawson found a yard ball and had a great time playing with it while I set up a crate in the bunkhouse for him to sleep in at night.  Bandit will be glad to have a roomie again.

This big boy is going to go through a LOT of kibble as we get some weight back on him, and coconut oil, and canned pumpkin.  If anyone would like to help us with that expense, we’d be ever-so grateful.

Dec. 5

Over the past couple of days, adding mushed up sweet potato (from my garden) to Dawson’s kibble has done wonders for his diarrhea.  He’s passing almost normal stools now.  And I think his bones are not showing through quite as sharply as they were.  He’s getting kibble measured for a dog of 125 pounds PLUS coconut oil.  He’s fed at 5:30 am, 9:00 am, noon, 3:00 pm, and 5:30 pm.

He goes inside at night to sleep and he is good about going into his crate and settling for the night.  In the morning he’s eager to get out but does not drag me back to the play yard.  He eats his breakfast, makes a quick potty run, then returns to his room (kennel) to settle in on the blankets on his Kuranda with his chew toys and his ball.  He LOVES that ball!

Dec. 7

Im going WHERE!?
I’m going WHERE!?

Last night we got back late (just before midnight) from a transport and I was messaging with Elisha at Friends Animal Shelter.  She said that a rescue in Boston had seen this page and really wants Dawson.  I mean REALLY want’s him, and they want him ASAP.  So I took Dawson back to FAS this morning where he will hook up with Brother Wolf (from Asheville NC), who will facilitate his transport to Boston.  Wow!

It has been a genuine pleasure working with this handsome fellow.  I loved the way when I’d bring his food to him (in a zip-lock baggie because I made up the days supply every morning) he’d put a paw on his dish and scoot it back and forth, indicating, “Here it it, this is my dish.  Put the food in here so I can eat.  I’m SO hungry!”  But he never went after the baggie or tried to take the food away from me.  Handsome and polite!  Happy tails, big fella!

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Bandit Steele: Notes on a foster dog

This is a foster dog diary post about Bandit.  New information will be added to the end of this post so all info on this dog is kept in one place and in chronological order. If you subscribe for updates, a short note will be sent when updates are posted. If you don’t subscribe, check back periodically to see what’s been added.

Last Updated: Jan 13

Bandit has been in foster care with Steele Away Home – Canine Foster and Rescue for quite some time.  He came into the program with mild aggression issues – more like intimidation issues.  Anyone who came up to him timidly would get growled at.  A confident approach yielded acceptance.  That foster believes she has him worked through that and, for a change, PMFC gets to be the Finishing School instead of Boot Camp.

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: Nov. 19, 2019
  • Breed: Shepherd Mix
  • Sex: Male
  • Age: Puppy, Young Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: @ 50 Pounds
  • Neutered: Yes
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: Playful, happy, friendly
  • Gets Along with: People, Dogs, (Cats unknown)
  • Crate Trained: Yes
  • Housebroken: Yes
  • Departure date: January 13, 2020, going to S.A.V.E.

History

Bandit was raised by a couple who lived in a camper.  When that was no longer a suitable arrangement he went through a couple of homes and into rescue because he had developed a bad attitude.  Can you blame him?  But Ashton seems to have done a fine job of working him through that and restoring peace and happiness to this giddy boy.

Progress Summary:

Detailed notes on this foster dog’s progress are posted below the summary.

Dog to Dog Behavior

  • Relates well to other dogs: Yes. A tad (playfully) overbearing for some.
  • Can eat food/treats near other dogs: Yes
  • Preferred style of play: He loves to run, playing tug-o-war, and tussling with other dogs.

Dog to People Behavior

  • Is affectionate: Yes
  • Is good with:
    . Men: Yes
    . Women: Yes
    . Children: Yes
  • Jumps up on people: No
  • Mouths: No
  • Walks well on a leash: Yes

House Dog Training

  • Willingly enters his crate: Yes, with bribery.
  • Is calm/quiet while in crate: Yes
  • Understands going outside to potty: Yes
  • Alerts me of need to go outside: Yes
  • Is destructive of bedding and/or toys: No
  • Refrains from kitchen counter cruising: No
  • Stays off people furniture: No

Commands:

  • Comes when called: Sometimes
  • Sits on command: Yes
  • Down / Off: No
  • Shake / Paw: Yes
  • Kennels on command: Yes

Bandit’s Medical

  • DA2PP: 09/26/2019 (SAH)
    Booster:
  • Bordatella: 09/26/2019 (SAH)
  • Wormed: Dates | Product | Dose | By
    .  12/15–17/2019 Fendbendazole 11ml PMFC
  • Rabies: 09/26/2019 (Paws and Claws)
  • Neuter: 09/26/2019 (Paws and Claws)
  • Heartworm Test: date, result (by)
    . 09/26/2019 – Negative – (Paws and Claws)
  • Flea/Tick preventative:
    . date, product, dose
  • Heartworm preventative:
    . 09/26/2019, product, dose
    . 10/26/2019, product, dose
    . 11/26/2019, Ivermectin solution, 0.5 ml
    . 12/26/2019, Ivermectin solution, 0.5 ml
  • NOTES:
    .
    .

Diet

4Health Salmon & Potato recipe, 1½ cups AM, 1¼ cups PM.
Peanut Butter Treats as rewards for crating and kenneling.

Progress Updates

In chronological order, newest at the bottom. Some pictures are linked to a more detailed Doggy Tale about that update, click those to open the related story.

 

GALLERY

Buddy and The Bandit, cooking up some mischief.

Detailed Notes

Nov. 19

Bandit has been living with Ashton for a couple of months as she worked him through an “intimidation” issue.  Upon his arrival I greeted him and he responded warmly.  He and Blondie Bear got acquainted, played a little, then Bandit went off to sniff out the play yard.  Before she left, Ashton put Bandit in his kennel and he responded well.  He is getting along with his neighbors: Major and Spartacus, and all the house dogs have been out to greet him.

At bed time, Bandit went inside the bunkhouse with Major and Spartacus.  I showed him which crate is his, he went in after the cookie I tossed in, then sniffed out his blankets before settling in to sleep.

In the morning all was well in his crate.  He walked with me back to the play yard and kennels, where his breakfast was waiting.  But it was too early for him to eat (6:00 AM).  He preferred to go out in the play yard and run in the dark.  And run, and run, and run…

Nov 22

While all three main kennels were occupied, Bandit occupied the middle one with Major on one side and Spartacus on the other.  Bandit would occasionally speak loudly at Spartacus (a small beagle).  Starty is about as unassuming as anyone could be.  We know that Bandit had issues of trying intimidate those who seemed weak or afraid of him.  So when Major left I moved Bandit into the kennel Major had vacated (after sanitizing it, of course).  For the time being that leaves an empty kennel between them to mitigate any chance of hostility between them.

I allowed Buddy Beagle to come outside today for the mid-day play session.  Buddy and Bandit played together a little then got into a contest of dominance, first with paws on shoulders, then trying to mount one another.  That got Buddy to growling so I ended play time between them.  Bandit seemed to be good natured through the whole episode, it was Buddy who felt pressured to stand up to the bigger dog.

Bandit has kept his room clean, waiting for his play times to relieve himself.  He has been quiet almost all of the time, and he loves going inside at night to sleep in his crate.  He’s not thrilled about the crate part, but does not fight it either.  So far he has been friendly with everyone who has been here.

Nov. 26

Bandit is getting frustrated.  He wants SO much to be a house dog, sees other dogs going into the house and stands at the door, barking “LET ME IN”.

But despite his frustrations he is being good.  He keeps his kennel clean.  He keeps his crate clean at night, has not torn up bedding in either location, and he plays well with others.  Two of the beagles are intimidated by his size and enthusiasm and won’t play with him.  One Beagle, the smallest one, turns the table on him by getting in under Bandit and pushing his legs.  This confuses Bandit so that he hops around with an adorably confused look on his face, “What’s going on, what is he doing?” then he heads for his kennel.  This 23 pound Beagle is just too much for him!

Probably because of his frustration he has not warmed up to me much.  He is not unfriendly, just would rather be running in the yard than getting petted by me on his play times.  He used to come when I called him and would let me pet him a while.  Now he comes to within about 20 feet and stands there looking at me like, “When I get what *I* want, you get what you want.”  That has to be the Shepherd in him!

Nov 30

Bandit likes to play in the yard with Blondie Bear.  When it’s his play time I leave him out for extra time while I do a chore: yard pick-up, mail run, or maybe a spot of gardening.  Today I was heading out for the mail run.  Bandit was down in the low corner.  I went out the middle gate.  I didn’t pay too much attention to Bandit’s activity because he would have to come all the way around the garden to get to where I was.

But in a masterful stroke of precision timing, just as I pushed the gate open enough to slip out, I heard, Pa-dum, pa-dum, pa-dum then felt a WHOOSH as Bandit rocketed through the gate with me.  NOOOOOOO!

Until a dog will respond to “Come” consistently I always attach a “handle” before I let them out into the yard.  This is a piece of light rope about 8 feet long with a piston clip on one end.  Nothing on the other end that might hurt him should it snag on something as he flies around the yard.  Something I can stomp on, then grab when he’s playing keep away.  Which he does sometimes.

Rather than getting upset (and letting him know he’s pushed my buttons) I talked to him the same as I would in the yard.  He ran a loop around my Mom’s house (probably to say “Hello” to the mail carrier who was picking up a box down there) then a loop around me to say, “Lookee, lookee, I’m FREE!” then off into the woods above our house.  I could hear his progress as he crashed through the brush, but could not see him.

I began to envision the poster: “Last seen heading north on Piney Mountain Rd”.  But then I heard it: children’s laughter.  Ah, ha!

I went down the driveway and began hiking along the roadway to the next house.  When I got there, there were three young boys, the dog who lives there, and the Dad in the yard.  Dad had Bandit by that rope “handle” and was looking at the tag I put on all of our dogs collars, just in case.  I called out a “hello” and asked him to hang onto my escapee.

The boys gathered around Bandit and all seemed to be having a good time.  So, we can add “good with kids” to his resume.  This is not my favorite way to learn this, though.

Dec 8

Today I tested Bandit with Josephine and Buddy Beagle.

Dec 12

Bandit was not happy with sleeping in the bunkhouse alone after Dawson Wigglestump left to go to Boston. But we have a new friend for him: Burton Flirtsworthy. But Burton is a lover not a wrestler, and he’s weakened by being starved half to death. We’re feeding him 5 times a day and teaching him to be a good boy. Can he handle being Bandit’s friend?

Bandit’s New Bunkie – Burton from Doug Bittinger on Vimeo.

Dec 16

Bandit has a lot of style.  He does the “shake” (paw) thing with extra flair, running in the yard is a fluid motion, and even when just lounging around in the sun he makes it look like he’s the best at it there is.

Bandit is willing to play with any of the other dogs.  Some of them are not so willing because he’s a bit rambunctious in his play style, and that’s intimidating at first.  But he can scale back to play with smaller dogs too. (See Dec. 8 entry)

Dec 28

Buddy and The Bandit, cooking up some mischief.

Bandit is becoming frustrated at not being invited inside to be a house dog and is acting out a bit: tearing up his bed pads in his kennel and deliberately peeing and pooping in there even right after he’s been out in the yard.

The bedding in the crate he sleeps in at night remains untouched, and he has not defiled that.  That is “in doors”, so is closer to what he wants.

We have had no incidents of intimidation or aggression with him.  He can be pigheaded about thinks like coming back in his kennel after free-play.  I still have to put a “handle” on him to have any hope of catching him before he says he done playing.  If I let him go until he says he’s done, he will return and freely enter his kennel to get a drink and a treat.  Before then, he will play keep-away with me.

Jan 5

Today Bandit met his match for exuberant play: a skinny little beagle girl.  Who’d-a-thunk it!

Cheyan Wears Out Bandit from Doug Bittinger on Vimeo.

.

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Spartacus: Notes on a foster dog

This is a foster dog diary post about Spartacus (whom we affectionately refer to as Snoopicus). New information will be added to the end of this post so all info on this dog is kept in one place and in chronological order. If you subscribe for updates, a short note will be sent when updates are posted. If you don’t subscribe, check back periodically to see what’s been added.

Last Updated: Dec. 10

Spartacus is a small, affectionate full-blooded Beagle.  Initial impressions are good as far as his relating to us and to the other doggos housed here.

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: Nov. 18, 2019
  • Breed: Beagle
  • Sex: Male
  • Age: Puppy, Young Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: 23 Pounds
  • Neutered: Yes
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: Bright, gentle, loves attention.  Extremely clever.
  • Gets Along with: People, Dogs, (Cats unknown)
  • Crate Trained: Yes
  • Housebroken: Yes
  • Departure date: December 6th, 2019, headed for New Hampshire

History

Picked up as a stray by Newport Animal Control on November 5th and not claimed, Spartacus was put up for adoption.  Animal Rescue Network of New England (ARNNE) asked me to foster him for them while he gets neutered, rabies shot, HW test, etc.

Progress Summary:

Detailed notes on this foster dog’s progress are posted below the summary.

Dog to Dog Behavior

  • Relates well to other dogs: Yes
  • Can eat food/treats near other dogs: Yes
  • Preferred style of play:  So far he has not engaged the others in play.  Likes to go on patrol with them.

Dog to People Behavior

  • Is affectionate: Yes
  • Is good with:
    . Men: Yes
    . Women: Yes
    . Children: Unknown but expected to be very good with kids.
  • Jumps up on people: Yeeees, but he’s so small and sweet about it he does no damage.
  • Mouths: No
  • Walks well on a leash: Yes

House Dog Training

  • Willingly enters his crate: Yes, with bribe
  • Is calm/quiet while in crate: Most of the time.
  • Understands going outside to potty: Yes
  • Alerts me of need to go outside: Yes
  • Is destructive of bedding and/or toys: No
  • Refrains from kitchen counter cruising: Yes (couldn’t reach them if he tried)
  • Stays off people furniture: NO

Commands:

  • Comes when called: Depends on what’s in it for him.
  • Sits on command: No
  • Down / Off: Sometimes
  • Shake / Paw: No
  • Kennels on command: Yes

Spartacus’s Medical

  • DA2PP: 11/13/2019 (NAC)
    . Booster: 11/27/2019 (PMFC)
  • Bordatella: 11/13/2019 (NAC)
  • Wormed: Dates | Product | Dose | By
    .  11/13/2019 Pyrantel Pamoate, 2.5cc NAC
  • Rabies: 11/26/2019 (Cedarwood)
  • Neuter: 11/26/2019 (Cedarwood)
  • Heartworm Test: 11/26/2019 , Negative (Cedarwood)
  • Flea/Tick preventative:
    . date, product, dose
  • Heartworm preventative:
    . 11/29/2019, Ivermectin solution, .03 ml
  • NOTES:
    .
    .

Diet

Sparty is a picky eater.  Does not care for cheese, does like peanut butter.
Now eating 4health Salmon & Potato kibble straight, and enjoying it.
3/4 cup AM, 3/4 cup PM
Prefers to drink water out of a stainless steel bowl, does not like plastic containers.
LOVES our Peanut Butter Dog Treats

Gallery

Patrolling for the Red Baron

WOW this is amazing!

My hiney hurts

Part of the gang now

Progress Updates

In chronological order, newest at the bottom. Some pictures are linked to a more detailed Doggy Tale about that update, click those to open the related story.

November 19

Spartacus rode home from NAC well.  He sang his song of Beagle Delight all the way.  Introductions to the rest of the Piney Mountain Gang went smoothly.  His only concern during play time is marking everything he sees, but that will start to diminish once we have his nuts nipped.  Sparty likes to snuggle and is gentle about it.

At bed time I took both of the kennel boys inside the bunkhouse to be crated for the night.  Spartacus was okay with that as long as I was in the room with them, but cried when I left.  He settled down eventually and hid crate blanket was clean and dry this morning.

He prefers canned food to kibble.  Meaning that if I give him a dish of kibble he dumps it over and kicks the kibble all around his kennel.  “Okay, okay, I get the message!”  I gave him canned food this morning and he ate that.

Nov. 22

Spartacus has been improving in his behavior: less baying and crying, less jumping up on me to get attention as soon as I enter his kennel as he has been getting frequent doses of attention and play time.  He is quite lovey and stays quiet as long as his people aren’t ignoring him.

He has been allowed to play with Blondie, Callie, and Buddy Beagle.  The two big girls were a passing fancy: he sniffed each of them thoroughly and moved off to engage in the very serious business of marking every tree, bush, and fence post in the yard.  That will decrease after neutering

With Buddy it was different.  Buddy isn’t much bigger than Sparty and he’s a Beagle.  Sparty followed Buddy all around but never really engaged him in play.  Hero worship, maybe.

Spartacus has done okay at keeping his room clean.  He has not torn up his blankets.  The first day he left a poop or two and a puddle in there.  But once he realized he was going to be let out every couple of hours, he stopped that and has kept his room clean.

Sparty is exceptionally sweet, gentle, and an avid snuggler.

Nov. 26

My hiney hurts!

Today Spartacus was neutered, microchipped, got his rabies shot, and examined for Health Certification so he can travel across state lines.  All parasite testing turned out negative.  He came through his surgery well.  He is quite uncomfortable this evening, but he came home with Carprophen so I’ll give him a dose after his potty run.

He will be staying inside the house for at least the next week so I can keep an eye on him.  Then, if he and the house dogs all get along well, he’ll probably just stay in with us until transport on Dec. 6th.

Nov 27th

Sparty and I had kind of a rough night last night.  Neither a cone nor a Kong Cloud in his size is sufficient to keep him from licking at his incision.  So I put a couple of rectangular dog beds together, Marie brought my bed pillow and a blanket and Spartacus and I camped on the den floor.  He was happy to snuggle in beside me and I could tell if he tried to curl up to get at his privates and prevent it.  Right after he got his pain meds we both got a few hours of sleep.  Once those wore off he became fidgety and needed more supervision.

Part of the gang now

In the morning the other dogs accepted his running loose and he made himself at home while Marie fixed the people breakfast and I fed doggos inside and outside.

Spartacus had eaten last night’s dinner earlier in the morning as breakfast.  I gave him just a few more kibbles so  he wouldn’t feel deprived, but he ignored them, eating just the peanut butter clump that hid his morning pill.

I claim this bed in the name of all Beagledom.

When Marie went to the bedroom to get dressed for work, Sparty accompanied her and laid claim to the People bed as his.

Uhhh, no.  I don’t think so, lil feller.  You are cute and all, but that causes issues with the other house dogs.  Let’s just keep things peaceful while you’re here, okay?

Sparty’s in-house behavior has, so far, been excellent.  He has not been baying or crying and he has not challenged the other dogs in any way.

Nov. 29

Nov. 30

We have a “No dogs on the sofa” rule in our house. We have one sofa, one easy chair, and our bed. The dogs have like 12 pieces of dog furniture for their use. We don’t think it’s unreasonable to be able to sit down when we want to. Spartacus has challenged that rule several times. I always lift him down gently and place him on a vacant dog bed explaining, “That’s for the people to sit on.”

Today I entered the living room and found this. I went over to pick him up and move him, but he glared at me around his cone and said, “You never sit on this part. You can still sit on that part. There’s no reason I can’t sit here.”

“Yeah, but … ummm … you can’t just … I mean, it’s not that …”

Hmmm … he had me there. So I left him sitting where he was.

I wonder what law school he’s going to attend when he gets to New Hampshire.

Dec. 3

We removed Sparty’s cone on Sunday.  When I looked at Spartacus’s incision last night it looked fine.  When we got to Cedarwood this morning for his follow-up look-see, part of it had opened up.  Chad cleaned it and glued it shut.  There is no infection yet, but I am to watch it and if it starts showing signs of infection we’re to go back and get some antibiotics that he can take with him.  He’s also in a cone again.
This is my chair now and I will take my meals here from now on.

Yesterday, Having conquered the sofa, Spartacus chose to invade the dining room.

He’s also found some new places to lie in the sun.

Dec. 7

We got to the rendezvous point in Bulls Gap okay Friday night.  Spartacus did not enjoy the ride: squirming and trying to climb onto the dashboard most of the way.  Once we got into I-81, he went in the back and snoozed.

We arrived early because the transport service said we should: in case they were running fast.  They have a phone number we can call to get the expected arrival times at each stop.  That said they were running late by 20 minutes.  So I helped a group of fellas whose car had died and needed a jump start.

10:20 came and went and the phone still said they’d be there at 10:20.

At 10:45 we got a call from Amanda (a name I know because Christine (my contact at ARNNE) mentioned her as being a coordinator for HEARTS LLC) who said she was there at the truck stop to pick up Spartacus so we could go on home.  The transport had suffered a flat tire and were going to be delayed a while.  I told her where we were and what we were driving and she found us.  Marie said, “I think we should check her credentials, she may be some kind of Beagle thief.”

As it turned out, the transport was broken down at the I-80/I-40 split and we were going to go right past it to get home, we could have dropped him off to them there.  I wondered if Amanda always drove out in front of the transport like that, then we remembered that HEARTS are HQ’d in Greenville, so Bulls Gap is just a short ways from there.  It was fortuitous that they had a blow out there and not at Lebanon TN, the other end of the state.

Dec. 8

I got word last night (Saturday) that Spartacus has arrived safely at the quarantine center in NH.  He will spend a couple of days there, then be released to his foster mom while his adoption is processed.  His foster mom and adopter may be the same person.  ARNNE likes doing foster-to-adopt as a trial run before the adoption is formalized.  I like that system too because when it works out it means less stress on the dog by not being passed through another home on his way to the forever home.

I’ll be watching for the adoption photo!

Dec 10

Spartacus is out of quarantine, making himself at home in a short-term foster home, and will be going to his adoptive home later today.  ARNNE says, of his adopters, “He’s going to his adoptive home today in Dracut, MA. His adopters are twin sisters in their late 50s who are retired. They have a fenced yard and an impeccable home.”  He ought to be very happy there!

 

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Major FAS: Notes on a foster dog

This is a foster dog diary post about Major. New information will be added to the end of this post so all info on this dog is kept in one place and in chronological order. If you subscribe for updates, a short note will be sent when updates are posted. If you don’t subscribe, check back periodically to see what’s been added.

Last Updated: November 21

Major was a family dog.  I don’t know what changed in their family but on January 19, 2019 his family surrendered him to the local animal shelter, and his troubles were just beginning.

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: Sept. 9th
  • Breed: Greater Swiss Mountain Dog mix
  • Sex: Male
  • Age: Puppy, Young Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: @ 60 Pounds
  • Neutered: Yes
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: Playful, affectionate, bouncy.  Occasional bursts of violence.
  • Gets Along with Dogs: Undecided
  • Gets Along with Cats: Unknown
  • Gets Along with People: Usually
  • Gets Along with Children: Undecided
  • Housebroken/Crate Trained: Yes
  • Departure date: November 21

History

Major’s family brought him to the Friends Animal Shelter in Newport to surrender him.  While they were there, Major appeared to be a happy, bouncy boy.  But when his family left him there and went away, Major became upset, then angry, then vicious.

The shelter asked me to come look at him and determine if they were going to have to destroy him.  Their staff was unable to handle him or clean his kennel.  I arrived with a pocket full of peanut butter dog treats.  Nearly all dogs love these things.  In about 20 minutes I had him calmly eating out of my hand.  I showed their Vet Tech, Carol, what I had done and how to handle him.  She continued these techniques and got him settled enough to place him up for adoption.

Except he was not adopted.  Nine months later, he’s still there and is showing signs of shelter psychosis.  And he gets vicious with some shelter staffers.  So they reached out to me once again, would I foster him to get him out of the shelter environment and help him regain his sanity?  Yes, of course I will help Major.

Progress Summary:

Detailed notes on this foster dog’s progress are posted below the summary.

Dog to Dog Behavior

  • Relates well to other dogs: Yes (everyone I’ve tried him with)
  • Can eat food/treats near other dogs: Yes

Dog to People Behavior

  • Is affectionate: Yes
  • Is good with:
    . Men: Yes
    . Women: Yes
    . Children: Unknown
  • Jumps up on people: Sometimes
  • Mouths: No
  • Walks well on a leash: Working on that (see Oct 14 below)

House Dog Training

  • Willingly enters his crate: Yes
  • Is calm/quiet while in crate: Yes
  • Understands going outside to potty: Yes
  • Alerts me of need to go outside: No Yes
  • Is destructive of bedding and/or toys: No
  • Refrains from kitchen counter cruising: No Yes
  • Stays off people furniture: No Yes

Commands:

  • Comes when called: Yes
  • Sits on command: Yes
  • Down / Off: Yes
  • Shake / Paw: No
  • Kennels on command: Yes

Major’s Medical

  • DA2PP: 02/20/2019 (F.A.S.)
  • Bordatella: 02/20/2019 (F.A.S.)
  • Wormed: Dates | Product | Dose | By
    . 09/05/2019, Strongid, 6.5 ml, Friends Animal Shelter
  • Rabies: date (by) NEEDED
  • Neuter: Done prior to surrender
  • Heartworm Test: 09/05/2019, NEGATIVE, Friends Animal Shelter
  • Flea/Tick preventative:
    . date, product, dose
  • Heartworm preventative:
    . 09/13/2019, Ivermectin solution, 0.6 ml
    . 10/14/2019, Ivermectin/glycerine, 0.7 ml
  • NOTES:
    .  Showed signs of stress at the shelter, is aggressive with select staff members.  During assessment on 08/31 to 09/07 he responded well to both Marie and I on all visits.

Diet

4health Salmon and Potato recipe, 1½ cups AM, 1¼ cups PM.  I am underfeeding to get his weight down.

Gallery

Progress Updates

In chronological order, newest at the bottom. Some pictures are linked to a more detailed Doggy Tale about that update, click those to open the related story.

Sept 8

I have visited with Major 3 times now and have had no trouble with him.  I can go into his kennel, pet him, hand him treats, and he will sit on command.  If I encourage play, he gets revved up quickly and can be a bit overwhelming.  He *needs* some room to run and a low stress environment.  He will get that on Monday.

Sept 9

I picked up Major today.  He gave me no trouble at all, in fact once I got my transport box inside his kennel I prepared to lure him into the box with treats.  But as soon as I opened the door, Major scooted inside and said, “I’m ready, lets go!”  Carol helped me load him up and he rode well on the trip home.

He enjoyed exploring our play yard and has settled into his room.  All the other dogs have come by to say “howdy” and no ugliness came of it.  We’re off to a great start.

Sept 10

Major responds well to the “come” and “sit” command.  Generally, even if he is all the way across the yard from me, if I call out “Major, COME!” he will come racing across the yard as though it is pure joy to comply.  The only exception so far has been if he’s “busy” either doing his business or seeking a place to do it, he will finish up and then come running.  That’s okay by me!

And let’s do a food aggression test …

Sept 12

Major has been here three full days now and has not once peed or pooped in his kennel.  I let him out every few hours during the day and he takes care of his needs in the yard.  I praise him for that, but he may well be housebroken already.

Major is also getting quite playful now that he’s settling in and getting to know the others.  He and Blondie Bear had their first play session.  Things were tense at first …

Sept 16

Major has not been especially, “frisky” when it comes to solo play time, either in his room or in the yard.  But this morning he decided to frisk things up a bit by tossing around his Benebone.

Sept 18

Major appears to have lost some weight: he’s got more of a waist to him now.  That might be why he’s more willing to run and play now.  That will only help speed the trimming down and toning up process.  He has an appointment at Cedarwood for a Rabies shot on Friday.  I’ll weigh him on their big scale then and see how he’s doing.  He has still kept his kennel immaculate.  He really wants to be a house dog again.

Sept 20

Major and I had a nice play session, then it was time to take him for his rabies shot.  He let me put a harness on him (better control than a collar should he need to be controlled) and I thought about letting him ride behind the seats, but he can get pretty bouncy, and with no one else around to help settle him, that could get dangerous.  I can’t drive and soothe a big bouncy dog.   So I decided to use the transport box.  I opened up the back of the truck and the door on the box and said, “In your room” and Major stood up, put his front feet on the tailgate, and hopped on his back feet.  He was willing but couldn’t get them up there, so I gave him a boost.  He didn’t like that, swing around and bit me on the face.

Puncture wounds this time, no flaps of skin hanging.  But his teeth hit my jaw bone, and that HURTS.

I put an ice pack on it and called the vet to cancel our appointment.  Then I notified the animal shelter of the incident, haven’t heard back from them yet.  Than I mopped the blood off the floor and went to sit down for a bit to just mash that ice pack onto my jaw and cheek.

When the bleeding had almost stopped I fixed a sandwich for lunch and rehashed the morning, looking for what I did wrong.  There are several things.  But to do them better would require more than just me being present.  That seems to be a recurring theme.

On the brighter side, when I let him out for his afternoon play, he responded to me as he always does, not appearing to be holding any animosity toward me.

Oct. 4th

It’s been two weeks since our unfortunate incident and there has been no more incidents of aggression.  In fact he has been responding to me as he always had before: a big happy, bouncy boy.

I want to try him at playing with some of the other dogs, but I need a helper to do that right, because if it goes badly it will go bad quickly with Major.

One thing I do have to give him credit for is that in the (almost) month he’s been here, he has always kept his kennel pristinely clean.  All I’ve ever had to remove from his floor is fur.  Major seems majorly housebroken.  I truly wish I knew if he could be trusted to to get cranky with the other dogs, I’m sure he’d be happier as a house dog and that would get him back on track faster.

He doesn’t spend a lot of time in the yard either.  He might linger more if he had a playmate but most times he goes out to take care of business, then is ready to go to his room and get his cookie.

Occasionally Blondie Bear with play with him a little, but she’s not into the rough and tumble play any more.

Oct. 11

Fur is all I ever remove from Major’s room.

This week has been just holding steady for Major.  No hint of aggression, keeping his room immaculate, playing well with Blondie, and showing signs that he’d like to play with Rosco.

The cool weather makes him bouncier than ever and he’s doing more running.  The running is good, the bouncing can be a little intimidating.  I think he’s picking some of that up from Rosco.  Rosco has the bad habit of running around me, jumping up and nipping my hands to get my attention.  Major’s picking up Rosco’s bad habit.  But when I push him away and say, “down!” he does settle.  Once he’s staying down I’ll pet him.

Oct. 14

Major is still dedicated to keeping his kennel clean.  He is doing better at leash walking, and was calm during his petting session today.

Nov 11

The past month has seen improvement in Majors leash walking skills, and regression on his people interaction skills.  He’s gone back to jumping up on me, something I had him broken of.  I’m pretty sure this is because he sees Rosco doing it and getting attention from is — even if it is a scolding.  I need to spend more quality time just hanging out with Major.

He seems to want to play with the other dogs, but his body language is hard to read: not sure if it play or a fight he’s after.  But he IS quite the Homebody.  He likes his room, appreciates the blankets and cushions, and keeps his room clean and tidy.  He really should be an in-the-house dog.  If only I could be sure what his intentions toward the others are.

Nov. 21

It was getting really cold at night a while back and I crated Major in the bunkhouse from 9:00 PM until breakfast time at 6:00 AM.  He really liked being inside and eagerly looked forward to settling into his crate for the night.  Once the cold snap was past I continued crating him at night, just because he did like it so much and was so good in his crate.

Last night was no different from any other: I took him in ahead of the other two, when we got through the building door I let go of his lead and closed the door while Major scooted into his crate, turned around and plopped down ready to receive his cookie after I retrieved the slip-lead and closed the crate door.  Only this time when I reached in for the lead he bit me!  Viciously.  Not a playful nip gone awry.  Blood was pouring out of my hand (graphic image), so I secured Major’s crate door, scolded him briefly, then went in my house to make repairs before moving the other two dogs inside.

I notified the Friends Shelter of the incident and asked them to come pick him up.  Obviously, I’m not making the progress with him that I thought I was.

I was going to leave him in his crate this morning but, not knowing when or if anyone was coming for him — and knowing that needing to “go” and being crated would SERIOUSLY stress him out, I decided to move him to his kennel for breakfast, then allow his morning potty run – just like always.  He did fine until I tried to pop the buckle on his collar (wanted to salvage the collar and tag) and he snapped at me again.  He missed.  I’ll sacrifice the collar and tag.

When Elishia (Shelter Manager) and crew arrived with a large trap to transport him in, he went into the box warily but once the door was closed and he was trapped he was baring his teeth and snarling at everyone.

The shelter staff all had a good cry this morning while they prepared.  I’m feeling sick to my stomach for having failed him.  Most of the time Major was a big, bouncy, happy boy.  But that tendency to suddenly lash out without warning or apparent cause is deeply disturbing.  We hoped that some resort time at Piney Mountain would allow him to de-stress and recover.  But, as Elishia put it, “When he lost his family it broke him, and he’s just not getting over that.”

Rest in peace, Major, may you find happier times over the Rainbow Bridge.

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Rosco Steele: Notes on a foster dog

This is a foster dog diary post about Rosco. New information will be added to the end of this post so all info on this dog is kept in one place and in chronological order. If you subscribe for updates, a short note will be sent when updates are posted. If you don’t subscribe, check back periodically to see what’s been added.

Last Updated: Nov. 15

Rosco Steele is one of several siblings who were rescued from a hoarding situation and have been in foster care.  His sister, Sable, was staying with us until just recently.  I can definitely see the family traits.

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: Sept 19, 2019
  • Breed: Feist mix
  • Sex: Male
  • Age: Puppy, Young Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: @ 35 Pounds
  • Neutered: Yes
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: Shy, clingy, feisty
  • Gets Along with: People, Dogs, Cats
  • Crate Trained: No.
  • Housebroken: No
  • Departure date: Nov. 15, 2019

History

Pulled from a hoarding situation many months ago, held in foster care since, but not trained.  He’s here for training and socialization.

Progress Summary:

Detailed notes on this foster dog’s progress are posted below the summary.

For a listing of Doggy Tails that include Rosco [click here].

Dog to Dog Behavior

  • Relates well to other dogs: Yes
  • Can eat food/treats near other dogs: Yes
  • Preferred style of play: Undetermined

Dog to People Behavior

  • Is affectionate: Yes
  • Is good with:
    . Men: Yes
    . Women: Yes, but prefers men
    . Children: Unknown – he’s pretty wild right now.
  • Jumps up on people: Yes
  • Mouths: Yes: this has turned to licking, no longer nips.
  • Walks well on a leash: Yes Keep the lead short and he does well.

House Dog Training

  • Willingly enters his crate: No
  • Is calm/quiet while in crate: Eventually
  • Understands going outside to potty: No Yes
  • Alerts me of need to go outside: No Yes
  • Is destructive of bedding and/or toys: Yes
  • Refrains from kitchen counter cruising: No Yes
  • Stays off people furniture: No Yes

Commands:

  • Comes when called: Yes
  • Sits on command: No
  • Down / Off: Yes
  • Shake / Paw: No
  • Kennels on command: Yes (with a bribe)

Rosco’s Medical

  • DA2PP: 11/15/2019 (Claws and Paws)
  • Bordatella: 11/15/2019 (Claws and Paws)
  • Wormed: Dates | Product | Dose | By
    Unknown
  • Rabies: 06/13/2019 (Claws and Paws)
    .             11/15/2019 (Claws and Paws)
  • Neuter: 06/13/2019 (Claws and Paws)
  • Heartworm Test: 06/13/2019, NEGATIVE (Claws and Paws)
    .              11/15/2019 (Claws and Paws)
  • Flea/Tick preventative:
    . 07/13/2019, product?, dose?
    . 09/26/2019, TevraPet Activate II, 1.6 ml
    . 10/27/2019, TevraPet Activate II, 1.6 ml
  • Heartworm preventative:
    . 07/13/2019, Interceptor, dose?
    . 09/22/2019, Ivermectin solution, 0.4 ml.
    . 10/27/2019, Ivermectin solution, 0.4 ml.
  • NOTES:
    . No health issues known other than lapsed HW preventative.
    .

Diet

4Health Salmon & Potato recipe, 1¼ cups AM, 3/4 cups PM.

Progress Updates

In chronological order, newest at the bottom. Some pictures are linked to a more detailed Doggy Tale about that update, click those to open the related story.

Gallery

Sept 21

Rosco is definitely Sable’s brother!  Their mannerisms are so much alike its spooky.  Like Sable, he is affection starved, like Sable he is really rowdy, like Sable he has no clue how to properly interact with people.  But these things are why he is here at Piney Mountain: we will teach him these and he will become a good pet for someone.  Like Sable, he will always be an active dog, suited for a family that likes a lot of activity, not a family that wants a couch potato.

So far he is getting along great with his kennel-neighbors, Major and Faith.  He does not stir up trouble.  His most annoying habit is to “yip, yip, yip” all night long if I leave him outside with the others.  To combat that I take him inside the bunkhouse and crate him.  He’s not fond of that, but Faith and Major get jealous because they both want very much to be House Dogs and try to get through the gate to the bunkhouse when I let them out for their late night potty runs if I take Rosco inside first.  Once everything settles down, Rosco does too and he seems to sleep all night.  So far he has not torn up the blanket in his crate either.

Sept 23

This morning was the first time he left me alone to clean his kennel and went off to explore the play yard.  Before this he tended to be with me, underfoot and in the way as he demanded attention, while I worked.  My neighbor was out watering her garden and Rosco decided she needed barking at, so that helped to draw him away for a while.  He also peed in the yard for the first time I praised him lavishly for that, hopefully it will encourage him to do that more often.

He is also sleeping through the night once I crate him in the bunkhouse.  I get him out again as soon as possible in the morning and he has not messed up his crate.

Sept 29

For the past three nights Rosco has been sleeping outside with his foster friends instead of being herded inside the bunkhouse to be crated so he doesn’t keep the whole mountain awake with his shrill (and LOUD) barking.  He seems to have learned that being well behaved means he gets to stay out with his friends.

Last night he did get into a session of howling between 2:30 and 3:30, but it was a soft “wooo, wooo, wooo” and it was intermittent.  I doubt it disturbed anyone.  I probably would not have heard it had I not been awake anyway.

Oct 4

Yesterday Marie got home late because she stopped for groceries on the way. Feeding time for all of us was later than normal as a result.

I was out feeding the foster dogs and Rosco started growling, snarling, and barking viciously: his back was up and teeth showing. But he was facing the back of the kennels. “What in the world is going on here?” I wondered, and I began looking to see what he was so upset about.

Then I realized: the setting sun was casting my shadow on the back wall of the kennels and he was trying to defend us all from this dark intruder.

Rosco is a knucklehead sometimes, but quite devoted.

Oct. 11

Not much progress this week.  He’s a little better at leash walking, but I have to keep him of a really short lead or he runs circles around me and binds my legs.  He also still has the bad habit of refusing to pee in the yard, but waiting until he’s back in his room, then squatting like a girl and flooding his room again.

There was another dog that a rescue wanted to pull from Animal Control, and wanted me to foster for a few weeks.  But I didn’t have room since none of my current fosters are ready to be in-house dogs.  SO I decided to build another kennel.  A temporary job, but secure and comfy.  Given Rosco’s propensity to pee all over, I decided to move him into the temp-kennel and let Ford have Kennel #2 — once I’d power washed and sanitized it really well.

Well, Ford got pulled by another agency the day before I finished this kennel.  I had to make a door from scratch, that took longer than I’d thought.  But Rosco seems to actually be happier where he is than he ever was in the “good” kennel.  Probably because he’d been on dirt since he was born, and that’s what he’s used to.  He’s drinking less water, peeing less, and is willing to use the yard.  Go figure!

Nov 12

The past month has seen slow improvement in Rosco’s behavior.  He has come to the realization that he gets more affection when he is not a whirling dervish trying to demand my attention by nipping at my hands and tripping me.  He is much better at walking on a leash.  And he is doing more solo-play (exploration) in the yard, instead of being always running tight circles around my legs.

He is energetic.  He will ALWAYS be energetic.  His thought processes are frantic, so his attention levels are low.  He is still food-centric, so training with treats is counterproductive.  Using petting works better.

Nov. 15

We said our “farewell”s to Rosco yesterday as he boarded the rescue bus to New Jersey. He did us proud. Earlier in the day he had blood drawn for a heartworm test, he sat still and didn’t even flinch at teh needle stick.
He was talkative (yippy) as we drove hither and yon, but wasn’t thrashing around in his crate.
When we got to the transport site he walked calmly to the staging area and was timid but controlled as other people greeted him.  He let me lift him into his crate and entered willingly.
In short: he behaved like a normal dog, which has been our goal all along. Good boy, Rosco, and happy tails to you!

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Louis Steele: Notes on a foster dog

This is a foster dog diary post about Louis. New information will be added to the end of this post so all info on this dog is kept in one place and in chronological order. If you subscribe for updates, a short note will be sent when updates are posted. If you don’t subscribe, check back periodically to see what’s been added.

Last Updated: Sept 15

Pulled from Newport Animal Control by Steele Away Home – Canine Foster and Rescue.  PMFC is fostering.

Base Info:

  • Arrival date: Sept 7, 2019
  • Breed: Hound
  • Sex: Male
  • Age: Puppy, Young Adult, Mature, Senior
  • Weight: 39.4 Pounds
  • Neutered: Yes
  • General Health: Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor
  • Temperament: Typical for a hound
  • Gets Along with Dogs: Yes
  • Gets Along with Cats: Unknown
  • Gets Along with People: Yes
  • Crate Trained: No
  • Housebroken: No
  • Departure date: Sept 12, 2019 going to S.A.V.E.

History

Unknown

Progress Summary:

Detailed notes on this foster dog’s progress are posted below the summary.

Dog to Dog Behavior

  • Relates well to other dogs: Yes
  • Can eat food/treats near other dogs: No Yes

Dog to People Behavior

  • Is affectionate: Yes
  • Is good with:
    . Men: Yes
    . Women: Yes
    . Children: Yes
  • Jumps up on people: Not usually
  • Mouths: No
  • Walks well on a leash: Not great, but managable

House Dog Training

  • Willingly enters his crate: No Yes
  • Is calm/quiet while in crate: No Yes
  • Understands going outside to potty
    No Yes
  • Alerts me of need to go outside
    No Yes
  • Is destructive of bedding and/or toys
    No Yes
  • Refrains from kitchen counter cruising: No Yes
  • Stays off people furniture: No Yes

Commands:

  • Comes when called: Yes
  • Sits on command: Yes
  • Down / Off: Yes
  • Shake / Paw: No
  • Kennels on command: Yes

Louis’ Medical

  • DA2PP: 03/14/2019 (Animal Control)
    .             06/27/2019 (Animal Control)
  • Bordatella: 03/14/2019 (Animal Control)
  • Wormed: 03/14/2019, Pyrantel Pamoate (Animal Control)
  • Rabies: 09/07/2019 (Paws&Claws)
  • Spay/Neuter: 09/07/2019 (Paws&Claws)
  • Heartworm Test: 09/07/2019 NEGATIVE (Paws&Claws)
  • Flea/Tick preventative:
    . 09/12/2019, ?product?, ?dose?
  • Heartworm preventative:
    . 09/08/2019, Sentinel, 2, 11-25 lbs doses
  • NOTES:
    . Has a scabby spot on lower back which looks to be from chewing or rubbing against kennel fencing.
    .

Diet

4health Salmon & Potato recipe kibble
1¼ cup in AM, 1 cup in PM

Progress Updates

In chronological order, newest at the bottom. Some pictures are linked to a more detailed Doggy Tale about that update, click those to open the related story.

Sept 7th

Louis making like a frog

I picked Louis up from Animal Control this morning and took him to Steele Away Home’s medical day for neutering.  He crated up and rode well, deciding that making like a splayed frog was hes best way to ride.  It worked and he rode there and them home like this without peeing or pooping in his crate.

I’m told he was good while he waited to: no fussing or carrying on in his crate.  He seems to not be bothered much by his surgery, and has not been licking at his incision.

Sept 12

Louis left us today, heading to New Jersey to find a forever home through S.A.V.E.  He rode well, walked politely to the staging area and crated up without a fuss.  He’s a good boy, a handsome boy, and I hope he finds a home again quickly.  Safe travels Louis!

Sept 15

ADOPTED!

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